This following information is from our partner organization www.beat-the-heat.org

Even more information here: http://whentospay.org/get-the-facts 

 

picture3aBeat the Heat – Spay Before the First Heat

(and don’t forget the guys!) 

What’s the best age to “fix” a kitten or puppy? Most pet owners simply don’t know.  This is a gap that opens up a floodgate of unwanted and unplanned kittens and puppies.  A study by Andrew Rowan project that close to 90% of unwanted kittens and pups are born to mothers who would be spayed after the litter was born.

 

SPAY ILLINOIS has undertaken the challenge of eliminating those “oops” litters with a very simple change.

Spaying cats and dogs prior to their first heat – making sure that we Beat the Heat – will prevent those unwanted and unplanned litters.

Other health benefits accrue to spaying prior to the first heat:

  • Research proves that doing the surgery four weeks earlier will reduce the risk of mammary gland tumors by 90% or more.
  • Spaying before the first heat will virtually eliminate many of the behavioral problems brought on by hormones:  spraying, marking and aggression.
  • Recovery from surgery, as well as the surgery time, is faster when cats and dogs are spayed young.

Remember:  IT’S NOT IF, IT’S WHEN!

MOVE THE DATE OF STERILIZATION BACK ONE MONTH.

By spaying (and neutering) by five months of age, the possibility of litters is virtually eliminated.  This simple change in timing could prevent an enormous number of litters. 

It has been estimated that reducing the incidence of pre-sterilization litters by only 35% would halt the growth of the pet population in the United States.

Beat the Heat:  A System Changer 

Spay / Neuter: It’s not a question of IF – it’s a matter of WHEN!

A survey by the National Council on Pet Population Study & Policy showed that approximately 70% of cats entering shelters nationwide are euthanized.  There are areas where the odds of finding permanent homes are even slimmer.  There are far more animals in shelters than there are good homes for them.

Other studies have documented that sterilized cats and dogs have virtually the same reproductive rates prior to their sterilizations as their intact counterparts:  0.313 litters per female prior to sterilization and 0.4 litters for intact females.

 

Links to Publications 

“The biggest barrier to spay / neuter appears to be a lack of understanding on the importance and appropriate age.” 

This finding is from “A & U Barriers”, a study undertaken by Ipsos Marketing.  Some of the key findings:

  • Nearly 75% of those asked who did not know what age was appropriate for spaying thought it was 6 months of older – or thought “any age” was fine.
  • 48% of pets were not spayed / neutered at time of adoption / acquisition
  • Only 14% of respondents were aware that over 4,000,000 pets were euthanized annually

For the entire study, CLICK HERE to download.

Here is the linkhttp://www.petsmartcharities.org/resources/resources-documents/PetSmartCharities_Research_AUBarriers.pdf

There are measurable health benefits – to both cats and dogs – in spaying prior to the first heat.

Roger Johnson, DVM outlines those benefits in his article “Schedule sterilizations early to keep patients healthy”, Veterinary Economics, May 26, 2010.  CLICK HERE to link to it.

Eliminate Pre-sterilization Litters by Spaying Before the First Estrus:  Making the Case to your Veterinarian,”  Richard Speck, DVM

CLICK HERE to download the PAPER http://www.beat-the-heat.org/spay-neuter/files/9113/3912/2126/RSpeck_Spay_before_first_estrus.pdf

 CLICK HERE to downlod the POWERPOINT http://www.beat-the-heat.org/spay-neuter/files/8413/3847/8539/Docs_Presentation_small1.pdf

 

 

There are measurable health benefits – to both cats and dogs – in spaying prior to the first heat.

Roger Johnson, DVM outlines those benefits in his article “Schedule sterilizations early to keep patients healthy”, Veterinary Economics, May 26, 2010.  CLICK HERE to link to it.

http://veterinarybusiness.dvm360.com/vetec/Veterinary+business/Schedule-sterilizations-early-to-keep-patients-hea/ArticleStandard/Article/detail/671642